The Athlete, The Patient, The Training Log, And a Modest Proposal-by Jonathon Sullivan MD, PhD, SSC

This is sort of continued article from Dr. Jonathon Sullivan that i linked in 2014. here:
http://wp.me/p43zCo-79

Worth reading 🙂

http://startingstrength.com/training/the-athlete-the-patient-the-training-log-and-a-modest-proposal

Many of the parameters tracked by modern physicians are esoteric, misunderstood, or even useless. We’re just not as sure as we used to be that PSA and fecal occult blood screening are really as useful as originally touted. Body mass index (BMI) has become its own punch line. The healthiest, strongest people I know have BMIs that put them squarely in the “very obese” range, and we all know “lean” people who are easy to break. Blood pressure, HbA1c, glucose tolerance, and serum lipid monitoring are important to different extents, and all have their place, but unfortunately the knee-jerk medical response to abnormalities in these values is to prescribe some new pills and see what happens.

Usually the parameters respond to the pills in a way that makes the doctor smile, even as the patient’s health continues to deteriorate. Because his real problems aren’t the parameters – his real problems are the underlying pathologies and behaviors that threw those parameters out of whack in the first place. The patient smokes. He’s fat. He’s sedentary. He never lifts anything heavier than a mega-burrito. He only bends over when he drops his Vicodin on the floor. Eventually, he will pester his doctor into writing for one of those neat little electric scooters so he can toodle on down to the Krispy Kreme in style.

But, goddamit, he takes his statin. So his cholesterol levels will be golden, baby. Mission Accomplished.

The next time you go to see your primary care physician, bring a copy of your training log. If he’s never seen you or your log before, copy off the whole damn thing and take it to your appointment. When you follow up in six months or a year, take a copy of what you’ve done since your last visit. Hand this painstakingly collected physiological data to your confused, bemused, astonished doctor, and say:

“Here’s my training log. It documents continuous improvement in various physical, performance, and lifestyle parameters that correlate strongly with my health and well-being. It shows the frequency, formulation, route of administration, and dosage of my exercise medicine, and how I’ve responded to it. It should be part of my medical record.”

Because, whether he puts it in your file or (bad doctor!) throws it away, it is part of your medical record. Maintain it accordingly, with diligence and discipline and care, like a good patient. Like a physiologist. Like an athlete.

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